You are hereUS foreign policy

US foreign policy


A Ukrainian tablecloth, a pair of boots, a faded newspaper

Stories of Ukraine from my grandmother and her grandmother

Opens October 8, 2014, Ongoing Exhibition What is the historical context of the current crisis?  How do political and economic interests affect the keyplayers involved? What roles do culture and language play in the conflict? How would potential resolutions affect the people of (what's left of) Ukraine? And most importantly, what would my Ukrainian grandmother have thought about all this?

In the main hall of encuentro5, an exhibit is unfolding of familial and cultural artifacts, photographs, videos, books, maps, and stories. Visitors are invited to explore some of the historical pivots and present-day nuances of this multifaceted crisis through a varied display of articles that were passed down from my grandmother or collected from journeys across Ukraine over the past decade.

The exhibit's collection will gradually expand and culminate into a multi-media presentation that will span the life-story of my Ukrainian grandmother, Natasha (whose name means hope), and consider some of the more controversial topics underpinning recent events in Ukraine. Presentation will be followed by discussion (date TBD).

The Other Elections - Democratic Triumph in Venezuela

Thursday, October 18, 2012, 7:00 p.m. On Sunday, October 7, 2012, months of intense campaigning throughout Venezuela culminated in a massive turnout at the polls, with more than 80% participation, and a decisive 11-point margin of victory for incumbent president, Hugo Chavez. The Boston Martin Luther King, Jr. Bolivarian Circle will host Omar Sierra, the Consul General of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela in Boston, and two local Venezuelan activists in a conversation about the election outcomes and what they indicate for democracy, economic development and the socialist path that voters endorsed.

The event takes place at encuentro 5 (in its new location right by the Park Street T stop and the Orpheum Theatre) at 9 Hamilton Place, Suite 2a, Boston, MA 02108 [Directions: http://binged.it/SxWgCB - note Google Maps yields an incorrect location, for now, please use this link to locate e5]

Campaign Kickoff: Budget for All Referendum

Calling All Peace & Social Justice Activists!

Sunday, May 6, 2012, 2:00 - 5:00 p.m. Now is the time to join together with 24 labor, peace, housing and community groups across the state to put our message before the public this election year. Place the “Budget for All” referendum question on the ballot in Massachusetts this November: “Troops home from Afghanistan now; Reduce the Military Budget; No cuts to Social Security, Housing assistance, Medicaid; Invest in Jobs and Renewable energy; tax large corporations”

We need you to help collect signatures to place the referendum on the ballot in your state representative district. Here’s something we can all do together.

For Information call Paul Shannon at AFSC: 617-661-6130 ext. 123

 

Why the Colombian Student Movement is Winning!

Tuesday, March 27, 2012, 6:30 p.m. For decades, Colombia has been mired in violent conflicts. Government-aligned paramilitary death squads have conducted thousands of assassinations and disappearances targeting trade unionists and farmers. Despite the bloody assault on human rights, Colombia has seen increasing levels of mass mobilizations such as the recent general strike and marches that brought to the streets millions of Colombians called by MANE (the Broad National Student Table). As a result the government was forced to withdraw the Washington-designed draft to the Higher Education Reform Act (Act 30 of 1992).

Zinn Lecture Series: Egyptian Revolution

Carl Finamore on the Arab Spring

Friday, March 23rd, 2012, 6:00 p.m. Carl Finamore, a leading journalist will present a first hand report about Egypt since the beginning of the revolution.

The revolution one year ago toppled the Israeli-American backed dictatorship of President Hosni Mubarak. But Mubarak has been replaced by an American-Israeli backed military dictatorship. This regime is openly hostile to the rights of women, to the desires of youth oppositionists, and to the needs of millions of impoverished workers – all evidence the basic issues remain unresolved, just as the basic power structure remains intact.

Health: Agricultural Workers in Nicaragua

Saturday, October 8, 2011, 5:00 - 6:30 p.m. Join filmmaker Jason Glaser for a conversation about agricultural workers and Chronic Kidney Disease in Nicaragua. For more information, see the website of the La Isla Foundation.

No Word for Welcome: The Mexican Village Faces the Global Economy

Thursday, September 8th, 2011, 6:30 p.m. Wendy Call visited the Isthmus of Tehuantepec—the lush sliver of land connecting the Yucatan Peninsula to the rest of Mexico—for the first time in 1997. She found herself in the midst of a storied land, a place Mexicans call their country's “little waist,” a place long known for its strong women, spirited marketplaces, and deep sense of independence. She also landed in the middle of a ferocious battle over plans to industrialize the region, where most people still fish, farm, and work in the forests. In the decade that followed her first visit, Call witnessed farmland being paved for new highways, oil spilling into rivers, and forests burning down. Through it all, local people fought to protect their lands and their livelihoods—and their very lives.

Vijay Prashad: Arab Spring - Libyan Winter

Thursday, July 7th, 2011, 7:00 p.m.  As millions of people across the Middle East and North Africa fight for freedom against tyrannical regimes, US warplanes bomb Libya with the stated aim of protecting civilians. But what are the real aims of our government's intervention? How do they relate to its wars and other policies in the Middle East? And what can those of us inspired by the democratic uprisings do to help?

Racial Justice Battles of the Forties & Fifties

Friday, June 24, 2011, 6:30 p.m. Join activist historian Mark Solomon for reflection on the racial justice battles of the 1940s and 50s - that great in-between period that provided the connective tissue between the great upsurges of the 1930s and powerful peace and justice movements of the 1960s. Going beyond mere generational analysis, this personal account integrates race, class and gender dimensions with a global perspective in an era when such transformative figures as Paul Robeson and W.E.B du Bois were still widely recognized and respected. In a period largely defined by the Cold War, other exciting processes ranging from epic national liberation struggles in the Global South to block-by-block tenant organizing in the US. Mark takes us back to that period and our discussion will help draw lessons for today's challenges. The event will be followed by a wine-and-cheese-style reception. 

American Uprising: The Untold Story of America's Largest Slave Revolt

Friday, May 13, 2011, 7:00 p.m. Join author Dan Rasmussen for a discussion of the largest American slave uprisng and its suppressed history. Speaking to his book, American Uprising, Dan will tell a story that reveals the strategic and intellectual creativity of a multinational slave population in rebellion.

Teach In: Demanding Justice for Haiti

Friday, November 12, 2010, 4:00 p.m. Speakers, film clips, music & discussion on the major questions affecting Haiti, 10 months on. Despite the earthquake, cholera, and hurricanes, why is aid money still held up? What do Haitians see as a vision for their future? How can we support them?

Come meet with a diverse group of students, Haiti activists, and community members. Discussion will focus on the key issues facing the 1.5 million displaced living in camps, what they have to say, and what our government has to do with it. We will draw connections between historical policy and the current aid effort. We hope to emerge with action ideas on how, as a group, we can work to effect concrete change.

E-mail, haiti.insolidarity@gmail.com for more information.

Building an Organized War (Tax) Resistance Movement

25th Annual New England Regional Gathering of War Tax Resisters and Supporters

Sunday, November 7, 2010, 8:00 - 5:00 p.m. [NOTE: This is Day 3 of the meeting, Days 1 & 2 take place in Cambridge at the Friends Meeting House, 9 Longfellow Park] The New England Regional Gathering of War Tax Resisters provides an opportunity to gain the information and make the connections necessary in successfully doing war tax resistance/refusal/redirection (WTR). The gathering is for both new and experienced war tax resisters, as well as for those just testing the waters. Together we will share and expand our community of resistance to rampant US militarism and endless war.

José Brito: A Coal Miner Speaks!

Thursday, November 4, 2010, 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. José Brito formerly worked at the Cerrejon mine in Colombia. He is a trade unionist representing thousands of workers at giant surface strip-mines. The Drummond and Cerejon mines produce 90% of Colombian coal exports. These help fire Massachusetts' Salem and Somerset electrical generating plants in addition to other generating stations in the United States.