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examines connections across international boundaries

Recent Land & Labor Struggles in South India

Friday, July 10, 2015, 7:00 p.m. V. Sandhya, president of the Progressive Organization of Women (POW), reflects on land and labor struggles in the southern Indian states of Andhra Pradesh (A.P) and Telengana. Sandhya started her activism in her teens as a student organizer for Progressive Democratic Students Union (PDSU) in Telangana. She became the President of POW in 1988 and has since held that position. POW has had tens of thousands of members in A.P and Telangana. POW has led several struggles for womens rights and empowerment. It has worked against violence against women and in particular women from oppressed castes and class. It has worked against displacement of people from their land and livelihood in the name of development. POW has also worked with slum dwellers, workers in beedi (home made cigarettes) factories, coal mines, construction, agriculture and domestic workers. It has worked with civil rights organizations against police brutality and torture.

A Ukrainian tablecloth, a pair of boots, a faded newspaper

Stories of Ukraine from my grandmother and her grandmother

Opens October 8, 2014, Ongoing Exhibition What is the historical context of the current crisis?  How do political and economic interests affect the keyplayers involved? What roles do culture and language play in the conflict? How would potential resolutions affect the people of (what's left of) Ukraine? And most importantly, what would my Ukrainian grandmother have thought about all this?

In the main hall of encuentro5, an exhibit is unfolding of familial and cultural artifacts, photographs, videos, books, maps, and stories. Visitors are invited to explore some of the historical pivots and present-day nuances of this multifaceted crisis through a varied display of articles that were passed down from my grandmother or collected from journeys across Ukraine over the past decade.

The exhibit's collection will gradually expand and culminate into a multi-media presentation that will span the life-story of my Ukrainian grandmother, Natasha (whose name means hope), and consider some of the more controversial topics underpinning recent events in Ukraine. Presentation will be followed by discussion (date TBD).

Imperiled Life with Javier Sethness-Castro

Wednesday, August 7, 2013, 7:00 p.m. Join writer Javier Sethness-Castro in a discussion of his book, Imperiled Life: Revolution against Climate Catastrophe. Imperiled Life theorizes an exit from the potentially terminal consequences of capital-induced climate change. It is a collection of reflections on the phenomenon of catastrophe—climatological, political, social—as well as on the possibilities of overcoming disaster.

Javier Sethness-Castro presents the grim news from contemporary climatologists while providing a reconstructive vision inspired by anarchist intellectual traditions and promoting critical thought as a means of changing our historical trajectory. For a recent overview of Javier's argument, see his essay at CounterPunch.org marking our planet's crossing of the 400 ppm atmospheric carbon concentration levels.

Books, light refreshments available on site. Use Facebook to iInvite your friends to this event.

Derber: Marx's Ghost - Midnight Conversations on Changing the World

Thursday, February 9, 2012, 7:00 p.m. Author, activist and BC sociologist Charlie Derber speaks to his most recent book, Marx's Chost: Midnight Conversations on Changing the World. He will be joined by Alexandra Pineros Shields, Brian Kwoba and Genevieve Butler. From the publisher: An American sociologist (Derber) travels to London's Highgate cemetery, where Karl Marx is buried. A surprise encounter with Marx's ghost, which reveals insights into the great revolutionary’s personality and biography, leads to a night-long conversation between Derber and the ghost on important issues of the day: the economic crisis, globalization; climate change, war, racism, left- and right-wing politics, the future of capitalism, new economic models emerging in Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, and Asia, and revolutionary activism by citizens in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya—even Wisconsin. The ghost reconsiders his theories as he speaks eloquently about American labor, environmental, peace, social justice, civil rights, immigrant, and gender and anti-racist struggles. Their engrossing, funny, and provocative conversation, interrupted by appearances from ghosts such as John Maynard Keynes, offers a new vision of the stunning relevance and tragic flaws of the historical Marx, who now reveals a surprising Great Transition to a transformed future. Watch this space for a review coming soon!

Rosen, et al: Principles for a New Economy

PRINCIPLES FOR A NEW ECONOMY

Preamble
 
The purpose of an economic system is to help organize human activities in ways that create healthy and resilient human communities and ecosystems for both present and future generations.
 
To achieve these purposes, deep system-wide change is urgently needed to reverse conditions typical of contemporary global, regional, national and local economies that exhibit one or more of the following serious flaws. They are:
 
·      Unsustainable: They over-consume and degrade the resources upon which their long-term prosperity depends.
·      Unfair: They multiply financial advantages to those already advantaged at the expense of those most in need. 
·      Unstable: They lack resilience in a time of growing volatility and rapid social, political and technological change.
·      Undemocratic: They operate with inadequate democratic control and accountability on the part of their most powerful economic organizations - corporations, financial institutions and governments.
 
At the root of these conditions is an implicit, dominant theory of economic purpose: namely to achieve continuous economic growth, as measured principally by GDP, by relying on “free markets”, without regard to the impact on overall human and ecological well-being. At the core of a New Economy is the need to decouple the achievement of well-being from limitless economic growth, by structuring economies that:
·      Fully realize individual potential through the advancement of human rights, including the right to thriving livelihoods, freedom from unjust persecution, quality education, effective social safety nets, affordable nutritious food, clean water, secure health care, and adequate shelter. 
 
·      Protect and nurture the richness of the natural world in ways that confront and rectify intensifying threats to humans and other species, including those associated with climate change, biodiversity loss, eco-system degradation, and polluted air and water
 
 The following Principles are designed to guide the actions of all economic actors and organizations whose decisions and actions affect, or are affected by, the pursuit of a New Economy.
 
Principles
1. Measuring progress - Economic progress shall be measured in terms of the well-being of all living species and ecosystems.  
2. Respecting natural limits - The economy shall draw from, and inject into, ecosystems only what is compatible with maintaining a sustainable healthy and resilient natural world. 
3. Democratizing the economy – All institutions that manage, regulate and execute economic activity, including private corporations, shall be democratically controlled in order to serve long-term societal goals.
4. Ensuring economic progress - Governments shall work to ensure prosperous and resilient economic outcomes by making adequate investments in research, education, physical infrastructure, and technology, whenever markets fail to do so. .
5. Localizing control - Economic policy shall favor subsidiarity, i.e., the localization of economic decision-making and control to the greatest extent possible consistent with democracy, equity, and efficiency.
6. Taming finance - All monetary systems and financial institutions shall be regulated as essential public utilities for the benefit of society as a whole.
7. Reducing inequality - Increasing economic inequality shall be understood to be inherently and profoundly antithetical to achieving human and ecological well-being, and shall be rapidly reversed.
8. Providing adequate livelihoods - Individuals shall be ensured of opportunities for decent paid work, employee ownership and the right to organize, and accorded recognition for work performed outside the formal wage economy that is fundamental to enriching  community and family well-being.
9. Re-defining globalization - International economic relations that impinge upon human and ecological well-being shall rest upon the same principles as those applicable to economic activities within nations so that economic justice becomes enshrined in such relations.
10. Fostering new values - Economic values shall be diverted, by all fair and reasonable means, away from the materialism fostered by promoters of a consumer society, and shifted toward values that prioritize flourishing communities, individual happiness, and a healthy and resilient natural world.
The editors of the Principles for a New Economy are Neva Goodwin, Richard Rosen, and Allen White. Principles for a New Economy was co-authored by the Core Principles Working Group, with the support of the New Economy Network. The members of the Working Group are: Gar Alperovitz, David Brodwin, Peter Brown, John Cavanagh, John Fullerton, Neva Godwin, Richard Heinberg, David Korten, Asher Miller, Noel Ortega, Richard Rosen, Gus Speth, Sarah Stranahan, Stewart Wallis, Allen White, and Susan Witt.
For questions and comments please contact: neva.goodwin@tufts.edu; rrosen@tellus.org or awhite@tellus.org

Alperovitz: America Beyond Capitalism

When they say, "there's no alternative..."

Saturday, December 3, 2011, 6:00 p.m.  As discontent with the economic and political status quo mounts in the wake of the “great recession”, America Beyond Capitalism is a book whose time has come. Gar Alperovitz’s expert diagnosis of the long-term structural crisis of the American economic and political system is accompanied by detailed, practical answers to the problems we face as a society. Unlike many books that reserve a few pages of a concluding chapter to offer generalized, tentative solutions, Alperovitz marshals years of research into emerging “new economy” strategies to present a comprehensive picture of practical bottom-up efforts currently underway in thousands of communities across the United States.

Health: Agricultural Workers in Nicaragua

Saturday, October 8, 2011, 5:00 - 6:30 p.m. Join filmmaker Jason Glaser for a conversation about agricultural workers and Chronic Kidney Disease in Nicaragua. For more information, see the website of the La Isla Foundation.

Linda Fischer: Global Crisis! Global Resistance!

Tuesday, September 13, 2011, 7:00 p.m. A wave of revolt is sweeping the world. In North Africa, uprisings topple dictators; in China, mass strikes defy repression; in Wisconsin, workers occupy the capitol building for weeks; and as European capitalism plunges deeper into crisis, workers and youth are responding with general strikes, mass occupations, and powerful protests. Meanwhile, the super-rich demand even more tax cuts, budget cuts, and layoffs. But a growing majority in Europe are declaring “We won’t pay for your crisis!"

No Word for Welcome: The Mexican Village Faces the Global Economy

Thursday, September 8th, 2011, 6:30 p.m. Wendy Call visited the Isthmus of Tehuantepec—the lush sliver of land connecting the Yucatan Peninsula to the rest of Mexico—for the first time in 1997. She found herself in the midst of a storied land, a place Mexicans call their country's “little waist,” a place long known for its strong women, spirited marketplaces, and deep sense of independence. She also landed in the middle of a ferocious battle over plans to industrialize the region, where most people still fish, farm, and work in the forests. In the decade that followed her first visit, Call witnessed farmland being paved for new highways, oil spilling into rivers, and forests burning down. Through it all, local people fought to protect their lands and their livelihoods—and their very lives.

Cochabamba Climate Summit - Boston Interactive Workshop

April 20, 2010, 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. Join organizers and activists in Cochabamba, Bolivia and New York City for a live interactive conversation as part of the Climate and Mother Earth Rights conference (hosted by the people of Bolivia).  This global interaction is part of the Cochabamba Expanded conversation organized by May First/People Link.

 

HR-4321: Comprehensive Immigration Reform in Age of Obama

A Discussion with Aarti Shahani, Mizue Aizeki & Joe Nevins

Wednesday, December 30, 2009, 5:30 p.m. Immigration reform will soon be on the national legislative agenda. All options on the table punish immigrants for global economic and policy failures. To consider the different bills, in particular the one that many progressives may offer critical support--HR 4321 aka the Guiterrez Bill--three important thinkers, Aarti Shahani (founder of Families for Freedom), Mizue Aizeki and Joseph Nevins (most recently authors of Dying to Live: A Story of U.S. Immigration in an Age of Global Apartheid) will join us for an early evening conversation and light dinner.

See here for summaries: 1. from the Immigration Policy Institute (this is an Adobe Acrobat [PDF] file)

Training for Transition

How to Launch a Transition Town/Transition Initiative in Your Community

Saturday & Sunday, November 21 - 22, 2009, Starting at 9:00 a.m. The Transition Network and Transition US (www.transitionus.org) are offering the two-day Training for Transition course as developed by Naresh Giangrande and Sophy Banks of the Transition Network in Totnes, England (www.transitiontowns.org). The course is an in-depth experiential introduction to Transition for those considering bringing Transition to their community. It meets the training requirement for local initiating groups to become an internationally-recognized Transition Town.

So What is the G-20 Anyway, and What Does It Mean to Me?

Tuesday, September 22, 2009, 6:30 p.m.Join us for a discussion to explore the following questions: What is the G-20? What kinds of policy decisions or economic strategies come out of G-20 summits? How do these policies and decisions affect our communities and our lives? What needs to be done to build a stronger, more democratic economy from the bottom up? We hope to have a speaking panel, TBD. Contact A New Way Forward Boston for more information or sign up for the Boston ANWF Google Group.

Greek Uprising Six Months Later

Friday, July 17, 2009, 7:00 p.m. Join Chris Spannos and Nick Stylopoulos to look back at the Greek uprising triggered by the police killing of 15-year-old Alexandros Grigoropoulos.

Nick moved to the USA from Greece, 10 years ago and he is now an Instructor at Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA. His passion and pleasure is being an activist, a grassroots media reporter and a blogger. He is a member of the Greek antiauthoritarian movement and the Greek antiauthoritarian newspaper "Babylonia", which translates and publishes in Greek, many articles from ZNet/ZMagazine every month. He is an advocate of Participatory Society and Participatory Economics and works on the Hellenic Project for Participatory Society.

Chris Spannos is fulltime staff member with Z Communications and ZNet. He is editor of the book Real Utopia: Participatory Society for the 21st Century (AK Press, 2008).