You are herehuman rights

human rights


Sacco and Vanzetti Remembered

Saturday, August 23rd, 2014, 2:00 p.m. - Gathering, Boston Common, 3:00 p.m. - March, 4:00 p.m. - Rally, North End (details below) The 87th anniversary of the execution of Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti will be remembered. Sacco and Vanzetti were Italian immigrants and committed anarchists whose trial is regarded as one of the great miscarriages of justice in American history. Calling attention to the continued repression of immigrants and radicals, the Sacco and Vanzetti Commemoration Society (SVCS) invites all to attend and participate in the ninth annual march and rally.

We will begin by gathering at the Boston Common Visitors Center (Tremont and West, Boston) at 2PM, followed by a march to the North End at 3PM, and conclude with a rally at 4PM at the Paul Revere Mall at 416 Hanover Street and will feature a number of speakers and live music at both locations.

Imperiled Life with Javier Sethness-Castro

Wednesday, August 7, 2013, 7:00 p.m. Join writer Javier Sethness-Castro in a discussion of his book, Imperiled Life: Revolution against Climate Catastrophe. Imperiled Life theorizes an exit from the potentially terminal consequences of capital-induced climate change. It is a collection of reflections on the phenomenon of catastrophe—climatological, political, social—as well as on the possibilities of overcoming disaster.

Javier Sethness-Castro presents the grim news from contemporary climatologists while providing a reconstructive vision inspired by anarchist intellectual traditions and promoting critical thought as a means of changing our historical trajectory. For a recent overview of Javier's argument, see his essay at CounterPunch.org marking our planet's crossing of the 400 ppm atmospheric carbon concentration levels.

Books, light refreshments available on site. Use Facebook to iInvite your friends to this event.

Forty Years in the Labor Movement

Lessons from Organizer and Strategist Peter Van Delft

Thursday, February 21, 2013, 7:00 p.m. At no previous point in its history has the situation of the labor movement been more dire. At the same time, new waves of immigrant and community organizing and the rise of middle-class activism may signal renewal for the movement that brought dignity to millions of workers. This event helps as look forward by first looking back on Peter's 4 decades of service to the labor movement.

About Peter: A longtime activist and a third-generation socialist, Peter Van Delft has spent more than forty years in the labor movement. Following World War II he attended the University of California at Berkeley where he earned an M.A. in Anthropology and where he was involved in activities leading to increased admissions and support for low income and students of color.

Until his retirement Peter was a Vice President of New York based, 30,000 member, District 65. Earlier, he had been a member of the National Maritime Union and of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union.

Cuba's Latin American School of Medicine

Thursday, March 29th, 2012, 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. Lillian Holloway MD grew up in West Philadelphia. She worked as a certified nursing assistant before deciding to go to medical school. She graduated from the Latin American School of Medicine, Havana, Cuba in 2009. She is currently a resident in Family Practice and an MPH candidate at University of Illinois Hospitals in Chicago.

PR: Student Strike!

An Evening with Gamelyn Oduardo - A Strike Organizer

Saturday, March 17th, 2012, 7:30 p.m. Join us for an evening with Gamelyn Oduardo. Last spring, students at the University of Puerto Rico waged a militant, ten-month strike fending off devastating cuts, tuition hikes, and privatization schemes. As a strike leader and law student, Oduardo served on the student coordinating committee for the strike at the Rio Piedras campus in the united effort to defend students against the attacks on public education. He is coming to share his experiences and draw from the Boston occupy movement as we defend our rights and communities. 

Screening: Knowledge is Power!

Friday, February 3, 2012, 5:00 p.m. El Movimiento hosts a screening of "Knowledge is Power: The Black Power Mixtape, 1967-1975." For more information and to plug in, contact Fernando, fjrodriguez787 [at] gmail [dot] com or call 857-222-9203. $5.00 suggested donation. See full page (click on title above) for a short preview.

Jarrar: Getting Things Straight on Iraq

Sunday, January 14, 2012, 1:00 p.m. Raed Jarrar is an Iraqi-Palestinian architect, blogger and political analyst who was in Iraq during the U.S. invasion in 2003 and has recentlyreturned from another trip. He is a former AFSC and Peace Action staff person who provided constant briefings to peace activists throughout the war as well as working with Congressman Delahunt's office to develop opposition to the war in Congress.  He collected his and his family's blog posts into The Iraq War Blog, An Iraqi Family's Inside View of the First Year of the Occupation, published as a book in 2008.

This event is organized by OCCUPY BOSTON - FREE SCHOOL UNIVERSITY

José Brito: A Coal Miner Speaks!

Thursday, November 4, 2010, 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. José Brito formerly worked at the Cerrejon mine in Colombia. He is a trade unionist representing thousands of workers at giant surface strip-mines. The Drummond and Cerejon mines produce 90% of Colombian coal exports. These help fire Massachusetts' Salem and Somerset electrical generating plants in addition to other generating stations in the United States.

MayDay Movie Festival Week

April 25th to April 30th, 2010 (At encuentro 5, Lucy Parson's Center, & Haley House) Leading up to the MayDay 2010 rallies and marches, join us across the city for six days of movies and discussion on the topics of workers' struggle, immigration, history, political analysis, and alternatives. Featuring an exhibit of Justice Artwork at encuentro 5 from local worker-run cooperative Red Sun Press!

Festival Schedule (read more):

Indigenous Virtue – Beyond Green Capitalism

Saturday, February 13, 2010, 6:00 p.m. Join Victor Wallis and Sylvia Escarcega in a discussion concerning the potential political and ethical contributions of indigenous thought and social movements to building alternatives to capitalism. Victor's paper, "Beyond 'Green Capitalism'" recently published in Monthly Review (61:9, February, 2010) provides a starting point for the conversation. In it, he notes the connection between the present economic recession, the crisis-ridden character of capitalist economy and the ecological limits to the capitalist growth model. But he goes on to observe that most of the world is still caught up in capitalist institutions and does not yet recognize the link between socialism and ecologically appropriate responses. He finds hope and examples in the Global South, insurgent socialism and indigenous resistance. Of the latter, he writes, "they express, more completely than any other demographic group, the common survival interest of humanity as a whole." Victor then traces how indigenous values may be connected to the "vast learning process... that revolution has always entailed." In doing so, Victor connects these values with on-the-ground practices while also addressing the international relations dimension.

Victor is editor of "Socialism and Democracy" and teaches political science at Berkelee School of Music. Sylvia teaches Latin American & Latino Studies at De Paul University.

The event is free and open to all interested members of the progressive community.

A Night of Music to Benefit Witness for Peace

Friday, March 5, 2010, 8:00 p.m. [Updated flyers attached] Join Paul Baker Hernandez (from Nicaragua), Sergio Reyes, Dave Scandurra & The Excited People, The Grass Gypsys.

Paul Baker Hernandez - Eco-Minstrel performing Songs of Loveliness and Courage

Paul has invaded Queen Elizabeth II’s private castle heading a posse of bishops and other church leaders protesting nuclear weapons, confronted popes with protest songs for global justice, joined Hollywood stars on Central American picket lines in Los Angeles, and helped fight off death squads attacking Salvadoran exiles right in the heart of the USA.

He now lives in Nicaragua where he has founded Echoes of Silence, a network of “artists with broken nails” who support community health, education, ecological and cultural projects, and with whom he continues to write irreverent songs about cell phones, dictators, Starbucks, and more.

Workers Rights with Steve Early, Dorotea Manuela & Camilo Viveiros

Thursday, February 4, 2010, 7:00 p.m. In the face of a deepening economic crisis and continuing brutal raids on immigrant workers and their communities, this event brings together union workers, immigrant organizers and community activists. It is part of the campaign by the Boston May Day Committee and its affiliates to unite workers across sector and borders. Join the conversation and help build toward May Day 2010!

Visit BostonMayDay.org for more information 

HR-4321: Comprehensive Immigration Reform in Age of Obama

A Discussion with Aarti Shahani, Mizue Aizeki & Joe Nevins

Wednesday, December 30, 2009, 5:30 p.m. Immigration reform will soon be on the national legislative agenda. All options on the table punish immigrants for global economic and policy failures. To consider the different bills, in particular the one that many progressives may offer critical support--HR 4321 aka the Guiterrez Bill--three important thinkers, Aarti Shahani (founder of Families for Freedom), Mizue Aizeki and Joseph Nevins (most recently authors of Dying to Live: A Story of U.S. Immigration in an Age of Global Apartheid) will join us for an early evening conversation and light dinner.

See here for summaries: 1. from the Immigration Policy Institute (this is an Adobe Acrobat [PDF] file)

Housing and Human Rights in South Africa

Saturday, November 21, 2009, 7:30 - 9:30 p.m. Join South African social movement activist from the Western Cape Anti-Eviction Campaign.

South Africa will be on the global stage as host of the 2010 World Cup. Yet, with one of the world's highest rates of economic inequality and social protest, it is likely that the country's glaring contradictions and its militant poor, perhaps more so than the "beautiful game," will be center stage next summer.