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Bernard & Ness: From Occupy to Workers Control


By suren - Posted on 02 January 2012

Friday, January 20, 2012, 6:00 p.m. Join Immanuel Ness and Elaine Bernard for a panel discussion on From Occupy to Workers Control sponsored by the Howard Zinn Memorial Lecture Series and hosted by encuentro 5.

The Occupy Movement is taking new and exciting steps as it continues to reshape political possibilities (such as reclaiming foreclosed homes).

The discussion of how to organize a society that represents the interests and aspirations of the 99% is a debate that is being held across Occupy sites. What would it mean to really take the Occupy Movement into the workplace? Into the heart of the economic system itself? And how to do it?

All of those invited to speak at this event contributed to a recent Haymarket Book "Ours to Master and to Own."

Immanuel Ness, Professor, Political Science, Brooklyn College

Immanuel Ness is a founding member of the Lower East Side Community Labor Organization, an autonomous activist organization in New York City. His research and writing focuses on social and revolutionary movements, labor militancy, and migrant worker resistance to oppression. Ness has just completed Guest Workers, Corporate Despotism and Resistance,(forthcoming University of Illinois Press) a book that examines the rise of guest workers from the global South in the US and labor opposition to employer abuses. He is author of numerous books including an anthology of contemporary labor: Real World Labor, with Amy Offner and Chris Sturr (Dollars & Sense). He edits the peer-review quarterly journal, Working USA: The Journal of Labor and Society, and has also edited several reference works, including the International Encyclopedia of Revolution and Protest: 1500 to the Present (Wiley-Blackwell 2009), and, with Aaron Brenner and Bejamin Day, the Encyclopedia of Strikes in American History (Sharpe 2009).

Dr. Elaine Bernard, Executive Director, Labor and Worklife Program

Dr. Bernard has a BA from the University of Alberta, a MA from the University of British Columbia and a Ph.D. from Simon Fraser University. Bernard has conducted courses on a wide variety of topics for unions, community groups, universities and government departments. Her current research and teaching interests are in the areas of international comparative labor movements and the role of unions in promoting civil society, democracy and economic growth.

Some of her more recent talks and publications include: “The Changing Workplace and Building A Union’s Organizational Capacity,” “Organizing in a Cold Climate,” “How to Get Momentum to Change the Structure,” “Why Unions Matter,” “Labor Rights as Human Rights,” “Why Health Care Should Not Be a Business,” “Social Unionism: Labor as a Political Force,” “Public Sector Workers and the Creation of Public Value,” and “The Way to the Future: Setting a Social Agenda for Labor.”